Author(s): 
E. Gold, E. Simon, R. Peralta with Communities for Public Education Reform of Public Interest Projects

Publication Information: 
http://www.resourcelibrary.gcyf.org/sites/gcyf.org/files/resources/2013/getting_to_outcomes_indicators_guide.pdf

Pages Referenced:      
pp. 4-34

Summary:
Commissioned by Communities for Public Education Reform, a project of Public Interest Projects, this resource contains an updated theory of change and corresponding indicators developed to assess the impact of education organizing.

Detailed Description:
The authors of this resource, working under the auspices of Research for Action, originally published a theory of change and corresponding indicators for education organizing in 2002.  Communities for Public Education Reform, a national funders collaborative supporting education organizing groups across the country, commissioned the authors to revise and update their original indicators work in order to reflect growth in the education organizing field. In collaboration with Communities for Public Education Reform of Public Interest Projects, the authors conducted a series of interviews with and reviewed case studies of education organizing groups in order to revise these tools.  This updated framework is intended to be of use to education organizing groups, funders, and educators.  The report identifies how each group might find the information useful.

The theory of change for education organizing is structured as a transit map with four distinct zones:

  • Zone 1: Building Power
  • Zone 2: Taking Action
  • Zone 3: Education Wins
  • Zone 4: Transformational Changes

Within each “zone” in the theory of change, the authors identify specific “stops”.  For instance, Developing Leadership and Increasing Organizational Capacity are two of the “stops” in the Building Power zone.

After explaining the meaning of each of the zones and their components, the authors provide a series of “indicator charts” for each area of the theory of change.  Each chart corresponds to a specific “stop” within one of the zones on the theory of change map.  Within each chart, the authors provide (1) an indicator of success, (2) an evaluative question that helps define the indicator, (3) specific measures of the indicator, and (4) likely data sources for these measures.

 

 

 

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